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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
that would boost their status on the world stage. the united states and israel have lobbied hard against the move warning it could backfire and actually set back palestinian hopes for full statehood and negotiated peace. but with some key european nations on board, palestinians view the vote as a game changer. cnn's frederik pleitgen reports from the west bank city of ramallah. >> reporter: the final rally before heading to new york, palestinian president mahmoud abass addressing supporters. the final decision is to head to the united nations tomorrow he says to enhance the position of palestine to an observers state in the united states and the first step to achieve all our national palestinian rights. if the palestinians win a majority in the u.n. general assemb assembly, the u.n. will recognize palestine as a nonmember observer state like the vatican. its territory to include the west bank, gaza and east jerusalem. >> for the world to begin to rectify a grave historical unjustice that the palestinians had undergone beginning with the creation of the state of israel in 1948. >> reporte
that the first thing all jewish voters look at is where a candidate stand on israel, that is making a certain narrow view of the jewish people that i find to be a, not true and b, it makes me angry. >> when i went to israel -- >> the obama campaign is taking the republican challenge seriously, firing back with an ad focused on israel. >> our bond with israel will be unbreakable. >> the ko chairman ofco-chairma called florida democrats for romney says it's absolutely not all about israel. >> i think we need to look at this as a business and put somebody in there that can run this country and bring pack the jobs. >> four years ago, obama won 78% of the jewish vote. political scientists say the attacks could cost the president as much as 5% of that support. the quift of about 25,000 votes. in a close election, perhaps the difference, now, jewish people make up about 3.5% of the state's residents, but 8% of the voters. >> good report. thanks very much. >> join us and the entire cnn team for election night in america. our continuous live coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern tuesday night. we'll be
your pick, libya, showdown between iran and israel and syria. why would the voters say this election matters more than most? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile. you can post a comment on the blog there. or you can go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. i guess they're all important. but the interest in this was particularly high. >> it was very intense. and obviously people out there want to know more. that's what we're going to try to give them. thanks very much, jack, for that. >> sure. >> there's also no doubt that this election clearly mattered for minorities, most of whom came out in droves for the president surprising those who predicted many would stay home. lisa sylvester's working this part of the story for us. lisa, you've got some new details as well. >> yeah, wolf, if you look at the exit poll data, what comes out clear as day is that president obama had the youth vote and the minority vote. and that's part one. but the second half of that is that voter turnout in the key swing states, african-americans either met the turnout rate of 2008 or in the case of ohio
said there were no more hospitals in lower manhattan open. but i forgot about beth israel. so there is one. laguardia airport. late word tonight it will reopen tomorrow, that is the good news. as for limited subway service that resumes tomorrow in new york, no rains running south of 34th street in an area that includes the financial district. sandy has crippled the nation's biggest transit system. some stations remain underwater. catastrophic damage to underground tracks and equipment. the mta says it's too early to tell when full service will return or if every subway line can actually be fixed. some may be beyond repair. millions depend on the subway each day. all of us in the city a few commuter train lines went back into service this afternoon. for the most part, commuters relied on buses, cars, and cabs and weren't being gouged on prices. gridlock as bad as we've been seen in manhattan. take a look at columbus circle, south of central park on the west side earlier today. one massive traffic jam, largely caused by that train, still dangling over 57th street and closed off
, which is important for israel and important for that region. there is a huge amount of work to be done because both president obama and mitt romney had basically said and have carved out the position that president assad must go. but they are doing nothing, certainly not u.s. administration has done nothing to make sure that that happens. and so that could leave the u.s. a little bit exposed to charges of weakness. and today his closest pal if you like, british prime minister david cameron, who was the first to congratulate president obama, said that he really wants to talk to, quote, barack, to figure out how to solve the syrian crisis. >> a lot to come. thanks, christiane. president obama might have won re-election last night but he lost the white house by 20 points. we're going to talk about the changing face of america. what it means for the future of both parties. >> it doesn't matter whether you're black or white or hispanic or asian or native american or young or old or rich or poor, abled, disabled, gay or straight, you can make it here in america if you are willing to try. [ m
choose obama and in germany 92%. in israel polls strongly favor romney who has vocally supported potential action against iran's nuclear facility. continuity and aid have been important to nations in transition. >> there are people that are worried that the muslim brotherhood is going to run amuck and not sure what they expect america to do or how gentle they want that american president to be but see something as to potentially save them from an islamist in egypt. >> reporter: what about china, on the break of an important party election of its own. >> how the work will be going in china. >> reporter: analysts say the reason so many europeans might be so reluctant to see an administration change in the u.s. is because they worry about what's forging that new relationship would mean to them, and politically speaking to them change doesn't necessarily have a positive connotation. in some of their own experiences lately, it's only worsened problems like with youth unemployment. savannah. >> michelle kosinski in london this morning, thank you so much. >>> just ahead, how well does c
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)